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Best Kept Secrets – Remedies for Nausea & Sickness in Pregnancy

Getting Through Morning Sickness Gracefully

It doesn’t really matter if this is one of the most common side effects of early pregnancy, that fact alone does not make the feelings of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, (NVP for short) any more bearable. It sucks. You’re feeling crappy, tired, irritable, weepy, your boobs ache and now the room is swimming around you, there is a horrible rolling in your stomach, your gag reflex is activated and you wonder when these feelings will ever stop.

So first, the bad news. 

The deceptively named condition of morning sickness was written about in ancient Egyptian texts over 2000 years ago and we still haven’t advanced much beyond the same herbal and behavioural remedies they would have used way back then!

For some women NVP may continue longer than the first trimester with ongoing symptoms and is called Hyperemesis Gravidarum. For this condition you will need medical advice and a treatment plan from your health care practitioner.  

Now the good news! 

Morning sickness (aside from feeling rubbish) does not have any harmful effects on you or your baby. Using these remedies can be an effective and comforting way to ease your symptoms until week 12 or so when hopefully you’ll transition to a blooming second trimester full of sunshine, roses and abundant energy and no nausea or sickness.

 

Try these safe remedies for any nausea and vomiting in pregnancy & let me know how you get on in the Mothermind community support group

 

Overnight lemon water

Before bed get a glass or bottle of still water, add fresh lemon (unwaxed and organic lemons are best) to flavour the water and leave to soak overnight next to your bed. If you wake in the night have a few sips and then first thing when you wake up drink as much as you can

 

Don’t rush out of bed

Yes.

Absolutely, I’m telling you to take as much time as you need getting up in the morning. But when you do want/have to get up – make a habit to put both feet on the floor and stand up slowly.

Your body is changing fast and your blood volume is increasing to support your baby. This means if you get up too quickly your blood can rush to your boots making you lightheaded and nauseous. The physical effects of NVP and your body adapting to pregnancy make it very important for you to get plenty of rest

 

Have a cup of tea

Being British this is a go to remedy for… well yes – every known challenge in life and NVP is no exception

 

Tea choices for NVP

Black Tea, especially with a slice of lemon can be fabulous at soothing a disgruntled gut.

Ginger Tea, cut or grate some fresh ginger root and pour hot water over. Steep for a few minutes and add a slice of lemon.

Fennel, crush 1 tablespoon of fennel seeds in a grinder and pour hot water over. Cover and steep for up to 5-10 minutes.

Mint, take a sprig of fresh mint leaves and pour hot water over. Steep for a few minutes and sip when ready.  

If you prefer sweet tea, add a small spoonful of honey to taste.

All of the herbal teas are delicious and effective either hot or cold and you can add slices of lemon or orange to them for a citric boost!

 

Increase your fluid intake

To combat NVP it is important to keep well hydrated and increase your water intake. Try to drink between meals and have smaller drinks with meals so your stomach does not get too full. Remember little and often is best for a delicate stomach!

 

Ginger Ale, drink flat and at room temperature.

Mint Cordial, a simple yet refreshing drink with that cooling aroma and flavour of mint. Mint has long been considered a calming herb that helps with digestion and the syrupy cordial can be mixed with water or taken as a neat spoonful to help NVP

 

Other ways to up your hydration game

Fruits and vegetables. Water consumption is very important during pregnancy, but all your water doesn’t have to come in liquid form. Foods high in water content work double time at preventing dehydration and constipation, both of which are linked to nausea. Try snacking on melons, carrots, celery, grapes, apples, pears, watermelon, cucumber and frozen fruit bars.

Italian ice or lemon slush will also help you hydrate.

Homemade freezer pops made from fresh fruit water & herbal teas mentioned above.

Sports drinks to replace lost electrolytes

 

Snacks

Sometimes it’s a matter of simply keeping your stomach from hitting empty. Eat small, frequent meals, and eat as soon as you wake up.

Prioritise healthy eating and unprocessed fresh foods as much as possible. Stick to bland foods such as potato chips/crisps, crackers and rice cakes to avoid setting off your nausea.

Keep a box of crackers or ginger biscuits by your bed and eat a couple before getting out of bed in the morning with your lemon water

 

Put together a Trail Mix

As low blood sugar increases your likelihood of experiencing nausea. Having on hand a selection of your favourite trail mix of fruits, nuts, and a few semi-sweet or dark chocolate chips to nibble on between meals should keep the churn at bay

 

Almonds before bed

Eating a high protein snack, like almonds, before going to bed at night to soothe morning sickness. Almonds are rich in iron which is thought to be beneficial to ease nausea

 

So now you have a few ideas to help you through morning sickness gracefully and next time you feel the rumble, try out one of these remedies to soothe and ease your nausea

 

And, if you have found something else that helps – please add a comment below & help other women struggling with this condition. 

In the meantime, I’d love to virtually meet you in our Mothermind community! Come over and join us for motherhood support and mental preparation for pregnancy & birth.

Love & Light

xo

Darcey

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Author Bio:

Darcey Croft

Darcey Croft

Darcey Croft is a Registered Midwife with the Nursing and Midwifery Council of Great Britain. Since graduating from the Florence Nightingale School of Nursing & Midwifery she has worked in all areas of obstetrics, supporting mothers in their pregnancies and delivering countless babies. Her current role is Perinatal Mental Health team leader for the county of Buckinghamshire, England. She has undertaken a Masters degree in Advanced Clinical Practice and has a medical diploma in Clinical Hypnotherapy. Darcey is an expert in Perinatal Mental Health with a focus on reducing stress in pregnancy and birth.

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Darcey Croft

Darcey Croft

Darcey Croft is a Registered Midwife with the Nursing and Midwifery Council of Great Britain. Since graduating from the Florence Nightingale School of Nursing & Midwifery she has worked in all areas of obstetrics, supporting mothers in their pregnancies and delivering countless babies. Her current role is Perinatal Mental Health team leader for the county of Buckinghamshire, England. She has undertaken a Masters degree in Advanced Clinical Practice and has a medical diploma in Clinical Hypnotherapy. Darcey is an expert in Perinatal Mental Health with a focus on reducing stress in pregnancy and birth.

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